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Author Topic: What does it mean to be well educated?  (Read 955 times)

Electric Guitar

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What does it mean to be well educated?
«: January 28, 2010, 01:43:51 PM»
I had an assignment to write a short essay about an article asking what it meant to be "well educated."

I think everyone should be well rounded in their education. In today’s job market, employers like to see applicants that are versatile in how they can apply their education. It’s important that students are at least somewhat competent in each so they can further their chances for success.

At the same time, we should avoid judging education based on preset standards. This is why I have never supported the “No Child Left Behind Act,” because it influences teachers to teach based on that particular standardized test which lowers the standards of education. NCLB also pushes educators to pay more attention to students having trouble learning, or even encourage said students to drop out. I agree with the author’s criticism of standardized testing. Each student is different and will have their strengths and weaknesses. I have always done well in English and Science, (except for Chemistry which I have never been able to grasp), but I have always struggled with Math. Does that make me uneducated and not worthy of graduation because I haven’t met the standards? It just doesn’t work to lump students together to meet a standard.

The only other thing that qualifies a person to be well educated in my opinion is to constantly seek more education. I have always felt bad for those persons who have lost faith in education and do not want to learn. Standardized testing and grades can horribly great demotivators as I can say from experience. There shouldn’t be a reason for a student dropping out or even graduating with no further desire to learn. It’s a waste of an intelligent mind.

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What do you think makes a person well educated?
 


Offline Heavens cat

Re: What does it mean to be well educated?
«Reply #1: June 10, 2010, 08:06:20 PM»
[Hi! I'm not sure if etiquette on the FAM forums is gonna push anyone to go batshit if I revive this topic. I'm kind of tired of some people on the main Furc forums so I thought I'd give discussion here a try. If I'm breaking etiquette I apologize in advance but I find the topic interesting.]

This is a question I've considered as well and I find your opinion on flexible definitions of 'education' interesting. My own conclusion hasn't been to make 'education' more flexible but to include a wider variety of terms.

For example, I have a buddy who's taking accounting at my college. I consider her a 'skilled' individual: she is developing a very useful talent that will likely guarantee her good mobility in the work force. However, if you ask this person about 'republic', she will ask you which republic the book is about. If you ask her if she's heard of 'weber', she will ask you 'do you mean the guy associated with phantom of the opera?'

I agree with your opinion that education consists of well-rounded knowledge. I think it's the ability to interact analytically with society. This includes a familiarity with a least the basic ideas and theories often integrated into this analysis. I'm biased in favour of a liberal-art definition of education. On the other hand, I don't think this 'liberal art' education is quite as useful as 'skillfulness' insofar as employment and material success goes. Arguably, you're better off being skillful than educated by my definition.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2010, 09:26:47 PM by Heavens cat »

Offline Julie

Re: What does it mean to be well educated?
«Reply #2: June 11, 2010, 01:49:26 AM»
[Hi! I'm not sure if etiquette on the FAM forums is gonna push anyone to go batshit if I revive this topic. I'm kind of tired of some people on the main Furc forums so I thought I'd give discussion here a try. If I'm breaking etiquette I apologize in advance but I find the topic interesting.]

you're fine (: i'm actually glad you revived this, i think it's a good topic!




first, allow me to have a bit of a speil. the ability to gauge someone's exact education through a title is impossible (high school diploma, master's, doctor's, etc.). the "credit" system that, i'm assuming, all schools have is a very flawed, unfair way to gauge how much of an education one has. our school required 27 credits for us to graduate. you can achieve this very easily if you are in easier classes, and graduate on time and blahblahblah. however, if you're unlucky like me, this can seriously hurt you.

i have been in advanced math classes my entire life, despite begging and pleading with my councelors to put me into easier classes. i knew what was going to happen, but they kept saying "i have faith in you1!!1! you can do it!!!!! yeah, inspiration!!1" i always hated math. i knew i wasn't going to pass the moment i was shown the material in my Senior math class, which was Pre-cal.

i didn't graduate. i am half a credit behind (i passed the second semester of Pre-cal, because it was Trigonometry, which i understood much better). now i'm in summer school to get what i'm missing. the only reason i'm sour about this? the knowledge that i am smarter than half the people that graduated. the high school found THEIR education great enough to qualify for a diploma, and most of them only got to basic English, Algebra 2 (which i took my sophomore year), and essentially had an easy ride to their diploma. i'm smarter than they are in many areas, my abilities in math, english, science, etc, are beyond theirs. yet, i'm not qualified to get my diploma.

this is why i find your question intriguing--not only what it means to /be/ well-educated, but what qualifies a person to recieve the title of a true education?

i believe that for someone to qualify as being well-educated doesn't mean they're in calculus their second year of highschool, writes novels for fun, found a cure for cancer, wtfever. to be well-educated means that they understand what is put in front of them, not just memorize it for the next test, and have the ability to apply it to the real-life. they must have common sense, and problem-solving abilities... and hold a conversation that makes sense. basically, they do the exact thing that school is here for: apply what they learn to their life so they can live, whether they're a construction worker or a big bizzynus man.

oh shoot... i forgot what i was going to say.